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Phrasal Verbs Starting with the Letter P

PASS OUT
(intransitive) to lose consciousness

Mary was so tired that she passed out as soon as she got home.

PASS OUT
(separable) to distribute

The teacher passed the assignment out.

PAY BACK
(separable) to reciprocate a bad deed

Al paid George back by punching him in the nose.

PAY BACK
(separable) to give money back that you borrowed

Max is avoiding Mary because he doesn't have the money to pay her back.

PAY OFF
(separable) to pay all of the money you owe

Some day I hope to pay off my student loans.

PENCIL IN
(separable) to schedule someone or something tentatively

I will pencil our meeting in for tomorrow at two o'clock.

PERK UP
(intransitive) to become more cheerful or lively

The movie perked up a little at the end, but overall it was quite dull.

PERK UP
(separable) to cause to be more cheerful or lively

Tom brought some flowers to Mary in the hospital. He was hoping to perk her up with them. Unfortunately, she is allergic to flowers.

PICK OUT
(separable) to choose

When shopping for watermelon, I like to pick out the biggest.

PLAY DOWN
(separable) to make something seem less important

Max played down his car accident so that his mother wouldn't get worried.

PRINT OUT
(separable) to print something from a computer

I need to buy some more paper for my printer so that I can print out my report for history class.

PULL DOWN
(separable) to pull something so that it comes down

When Max drinks too much, he sometimes pulls his pants down in public.

PUT ACROSS
(separable) to communicate; convey effectively

During the meeting, management put across the message that our concerns were insignificant.

PUT AWAY
(separable) to discard; renounce

Let's put away our worries, and live for the moment.

PUT AWAY
(separable) to consume

I watched Max put away several hamburgers in just a few minutes.

PUT AWAY
(separable) to confine; incarcerate; imprison

The government put Sherman away for a year for having the wrong information on his website.

PUT BACK
(separable) to place something where it was previously

When you finish the milk, please don't put the empty container back in the fridge.

PUT DOWN
(separable) to insult or make disparaging remarks about someone

I feel sorry for Max. Everytime he and Mary get together with their friends Mary puts him down in front of everybody.

PUT DOWN
(separable) to kill a sick or injured animal (usually out of mercy)

The vet said it was necessary to put down the race horse because of its broken leg.

PUT OFF
(separable) to postpone

Many students put off doing their homework until it is almost too late.

PUT ON
(separable) to dress oneself with; to wear; to don

Mary put her best dress on.

PUT ON
(separable) to produce; perform

The theater group put on a great show.

PUT ON
(separable) to fool; mislead for amusement

You're putting me on!

PUT OUT
(separable) to extinguish

The firefighters put the fire out.

PUT OUT
(separable) to publish; issue

The government put out a news brief to misinform the public.

PUT OUT
(separable) to exert, extend

The workers put out considerable effort to get the job done on time.

PUT OUT
(separable) to expel

Please put the cat out.

PUT THROUGH
(separable) to implement; bring to a successful conclusion

The committee was unable to put through any reforms on campaign financing.

PUT THROUGH
(separable) to make a telephone connection for

Operator, put me through to the president!

PUT UP
(separable) to raise; erect; build

The construction workers put the buildings up in just a few days.

PUT UP
(separable) to accommodate; provide food a shelter to

The government put the refugees up in temporary housing.

PUT UP WITH
(inseparable) to tolerate

Max has great difficulty putting up with noisy children.

Category: Phrasal Verbs | Added by: Teacher_Koce (2014-01-17)
Views: 1194 | Tags: phrasal verbs
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