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C
CALL OFF
(separable) to cancel

Mary decided to call off her wedding with max.

CALL UP
(separable) to telephone

Mary called the priest up to tell him the wedding was off.

CALM DOWN
(separable) to stop being emotionally distressed

Max was so upset that nothing could calm him down.

CARRY ON
(intransitive) to continue

Max was not sure if he could carry on any longer.

CATCH ON
(intransitive) to become popular

Max is hoping that being short, fat, and bald will catch on.

CHECK IN
(separable) to register(usually at a hotel, airport, or hospital)

The terrorist sweated nervously as he checked his baggage in.

CHEER ON
(separable) to support or encourage with shouts of praise

The crowd at the marathon cheered the runners on.

CHEER UP
(intransitive) to become happier or less miserable

Max cheered up at the end of the night.

CHEER UP
(separable) to make someone become happier or less miserable

We tried very hard to cheer Mary up, but nothing we did worked.

CHICKEN OUT
(intransitive) not to do something because of fear

Max wanted to ask Mary out on a date, but he chickened out.

CLEAN UP
(separable) to clean completely

When living with others it is important to clean up after yourself.

COLOR IN
(separable) to fill with color (usually an outline)

Max happily colored in the pictures in his textbook.

COME ABOUT
(intransitive) to happen

How did that come about?

COME ACROSS
(inseparable) to find by chance

As Max was cleaning up his room he came across Mary's phone number.

COME ALONG
(intransitive) to appear

Max was quite happy until Mary came along.

COME ALONG
(intransitive) to accompany someone who takes the lead

Ralph asked me to come along on the trip, but I decided not to.

COME ALONG
(intransitive) to progress

Things are coming along well at work these days.

COME AROUND
(intransitive) to change one?s opinion or position

After our long debate, Max finally came around to my point of view.

COME BACK
(intransitive) to reply, retort

When Max criticized Mary, Mary came back with some very sharp criticism of Max.

COME BACK
(intransitive) to even the score (sports)

France came back to beat England after being down 1-0 all game.

COME BACK
(intransitive) to recall

I think I remember that story. It?s all coming back to me now.

COME BACK
(intransitive) to be restored

I was sick and weak, but now I feel better and my strength is coming back.

COME BACK
(intransitive) to return to a place one has been before; to return to a previous activity

Max left our office, but quickly came back after discovering he had left his keys here.

COME BY
(inseparable) to obtain (accidentally)

I?m not sure how I came by this hat, but I?ve had it for years.

COME BY
(intransitive) to visit informally

I was in the neighborhood so I thought I would come by to see how you were doing.

COME DOWN
(intransitive) to become sick

Max came down with the flu.

COME DOWN
(intransitive) to reduce to the essential element

In politics everything really just comes down to the economy.

COME DOWN
(intransitive) to precipitate, fall from clouds

Snow has been coming down for about 2 hours now.

COME DOWN
(intransitive) to descend, fall, go down

It?s been hot all day. Finally the temperature is starting to come down a bit.

COME DOWN
(intransitive) to criticize

Max came down on Mary for not washing the dishes after dinner.

COME IN
(intransitive) to arrive, get in

News came in that next year?s car models have just come in.

COME IN
(intransitive) to place in a race or contest

Frank came in second in the Boston Marathon.

COME IN
(intransitive) to be received (signal)

No matter how much Max adjusted the antenna, the radio station just didn?t come in very well.

COME INTO
(inseparable) to acquire

Mary came into a lot of money when her grandfather passed away.

COME OFF
(intransitive) to appear

George doesn?t come off as being very intelligent.

COME OFF
(intransitive) to fare, happen in a particular manner

The meeting came off as well as could be expected.

COME OFF
(inseparable) to have recently completed or recovered from

After coming off a nasty hip injury, Andre went on to win the US Open.

COME ON
(inseparable) to advance progressively

Our soccer game ended as darkness came on.

COME ON
(intransitive) to project a particular personal image

Mary comes on as a very serious person, but is actually quite fun.

COME ON
(intransitive) to start running, become available

I wish the electricity would come on again. It?s dark in here

COME OUT
(intransitive) to become known, to come into public view, to debut

The news of the candidates past sexual misconduct came out just before the election.

COME OUT
(intransitive) to turn out, result

Everything came out fine in the end

COME OUT
(intransitive) to declare one?s position publicly

The senator came out against gay marriage.

COME OUT
(intransitive) to reveal that oneself as homosexual

After years of trying to act straight, Max finally came out.

COME OVER
(intransitive) to change sides

Mary has finally come over to our way of seeing things.

COME OVER
(intransitive) to visit casually

Max and Mary are coming over to watch football tonight.

COME THROUGH
(intransitive) to do what is expected or required

I really needed to get tickets to the show and Max, my buddy, came through for me and got me a pair.

COME THROUGH
(intransitive) to be communicated

Mary?s displeasure with Max really came through when she hit him upside the head.

COME UP
(intransitive) to be mentioned

In Max's conversation with Mary, the topic of their wedding never came up.

COME UP
(intransitive) to approach, draw near

Mary came up and introduced herself.

COME UP WITH
(inseparable) think of

Max came up with a brilliant idea.

COME UPON
(inseparable) to meet or discover by accident

Max came upon a twenty dollar bill while walking down the street.

COPY DOWN
(separable) to record in writing

Max told Mary about the idea. She copied it down and sold it to the highest bidder.

CRANK UP
(separable) to increase the power or volume

Every time that song comes on the radio, I crank it up.

CROSS OUT
(separable) to draw a line through something

I didn?t have an eraser, so I had to cross out my mistakes instead.

CUT DOWN
(inseparable) to reduce

Max decided to cut down his alcohol consumption.

Category: Phrasal Verbs | Added by: Teacher_Koce (2014-01-14)
Views: 1309 | Tags: phrasal verbs
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